Grow Modernly, Grip Conventionally

For many, the battles are on the ground. For modern society, it happens within the mind. When conventional values from home diminish, countered by ultra fast culture movement, this edition’s contributor, Dio ponders on how the roots shaped earlier can survive the modernization era.

When we come to think of our roots, the shadow of our parents inevitably sheds us with our identity and character. Within the upbringing periods, we have sequences when we wondered who our parents are, who we really think they represent, and what they have been through in the past. Those aspects account to the value they plant in us, from the very basic things such as shaking hands, saying hello, and respecting the elderly, to the vision of what kind of life we lead to.

When is the last time we actually thank our parents for teaching us on what to expect and achieve in life? Have we ever thanked them for being our backbone? Yes, in a fully functioning family, parents form the roots of their descendants. Biologically, root is something that holds a plant up to provide it with a strong base and nutrients. For some of us, the strong base always has been our character. For some others it has been a providing family. The nutrients? Continuous support and upheld values such as respect, honesty and heaps of other things which then, if adequately acquired and processed will make a healthy, attractive and strong tree—us.

But after a while the children will stop listening to their parents’ advice, because they think that they have the choice. We, once a kid now an adult, rearrange the nutrients and solid base ourselves, with the influence of external factor called modernization, that has also pretty much affected our parents.

Modernization shapes every aspect of our social, personal, and public life. It occupies how we dress, what music we listen to, how we work, and various facets of our decision on day to day basis. It collates our modern thinking with old values of respect and honor which have been now ignored, thanks to the value of things and money. Every new price tag finds itself in our bin and new gloss of fashion overwhelms our friends in pure admirations of the new culture. But where has the old one gone?

Every new price tag finds itself in our bin and new gloss of fashion overwhelms our friends in pure admirations of the new culture. 

Modernization does not directly push us away from our long learned morals; it indirectly points us to what is more convenient. Then what is so wrong about living a more comfortable way? It is because all of us stand on something, a platform which, through modernization will soon be so dirty, that we cannot see or feel anymore. Our base potentially becomes blur it will eventually go away. Until we realise that floating in space without proper roots is not what we crave for. It comes moment where no one can actually help us except ourselves, because the choice is always ours. If we let go and give in to rapid urbanization, what can we teach our children? Can we really stand up by ourselves without any feet? Can we sing without a throat? To everything there is a basic formula, which enables you to master the whole programme—lose it and your whole programme will go defunct.

To everything there is a basic formula, which enables you to master the whole programme—lose it and your whole programme will go defunct.

Indeed, clutching to the old ways does not aid us either. The solution to this is simply arriving at a midpoint.  Send messages, but still talk to them. Don’t just smile at people but shake their hands. Say “excuse me” while passing people, even with earphones in. Write emails as enthusiastic as postcards. The most important aspect of reaching out to your roots is this, though. Express your opinions to your parents with love and respect and be thankful for everything they do for you. They always want the best for you. SO, reach out. Find your true self. Find what is buried deep inside and don’t forget important morals that shape your character because a tree cannot stand without its roots and cannot grow strong without enough nutrition support.

Text: Dioputra Ilham Oepangat
Edit: Gabriela Yosefina
Image: minimaliste